Industrial Engagement Strategy

Many of the innovative Earth Observation instrumentation technologies funded by CEOI have applications across much wider sections of industry than just space. Through broad engagement with industry, we have identified potential applications in the Aerospace, Defence & Security, Environment, Maritime, Medical, Oil & Gas, Process Control, Rail, Road, Survey, and Water sectors.

To make these sectors aware of CEOI funded technologies and to help develop relationships between industry and the project teams, CEOI runs a series of workshops, technology showcases, and information dissemination activities managed by Qi3, our KE Programme partner. Qi3 also works with individuals to help broker and develop partnerships and collaborations with those wishing to work with the technologies developed within CEOI projects. Increasing engagement with wider communities, including academia and Government, is also a priority.

A key concept within our industry engagement is the ability to be able to ‘spin in’ and ‘spin out’ technologies. While we are constantly looking for non-space applications of our innovative new technologies, we are also looking to other industries for technologies that can solve space’s technical challenges. Space/Earth Observation R&D is often viewed as part of a generalised technology roadmap where technologies are jointly developed for space and other sector applications – a ‘spin-along’ model. This joint development model culminates in a win-win situation for both space and traditional markets.

If you are interested in gaining more information on CEOI’s projects and technologies (spin-out), have technologies that can address space’s current technical challenges (spin-in), or have ideas for joint development projects (spin-along), please contact Prof Mick Johnson (CEOI Director) at mick.johnson@airbus.com or Robin Higgons (Industry Coordinator) at robin.higgons@qi3.co.uk.

Events

Case Studies   

Industry Consultation Workshops

          Technology Articles                

   Credit: ESA